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I have been trying like crazy to get some information on the 68W MOS and some of the ASIs that go along with it, but my recruiter is out of the office this week and I would rather hear from people that actual do the job. I have a pretty good handle on what the job entails both in the field and at Army Medical Centers, but I am more concerned with the M6 identifier. I have a bachelors degree in Political Science and I served 4 years in the AF as a mechanic, but I am looking to break into the medical career field. Every community college in my area with an LPN program has a two year waiting list AFTER you finish your pre-requisites. While obviously enlisting WITH the identifier would be ideal, I realize that these slots are hard to come by, and are given to the guys and gals re-enlisting first. My question is, if I enlist for two years as a 68W, do I have a good shot of getting the M6 idenitifer when I re-up? I know no one here is the amazing kreskin and can see two years into the future, but I would also hate to be locked into something that does not provide me the opprotunity to broden both my career field knowlege and my civilian employment prospects. Also when I go to MEPS will I able to serch nationwide reserve openings? I wouldnt mind relocating as after I come out of 18 weeks in the 68W program and 52 weeks in the 6M program I will have some decent coin saved up from being in training for a year and half and having an LPN certification. Also any information on decent assigments would be much appreciated. Thank you so much for your service and your help with my questions!

PS. My plan is to get the LPN then find an online LPN to BSN program and eventually get into AMEDD as a nurse.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 02 March 2009Report This Post

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I actually have the exact same question. . I'm in a non-medical MOS, and I want to become a 68WM6. I've been told I can't renlist for both a different MOS and an ASI. Are we screwed?
 
Posts: 11 | Registered: 02 January 2009Report This Post

Picture of JMW3CC
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quote:
Originally posted by wallace:
I actually have the exact same question. . I'm in a non-medical MOS, and I want to become a 68WM6. I've been told I can't renlist for both a different MOS and an ASI. Are we screwed?
According to the ATRRS Catalog, you must serve 24 months as a 68W before you can attend the M6 course. When you reenlist, you only get one school option under Option-3 Army Training; so 68W would be the school you apply for and then drop a 4187 once you have two years in the MOS.
 
Posts: 681 | Location: ARMY WIDE | Registered: 10 February 2009Report This Post

Picture of SSG. T
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Be careful what you ask for fellaz. Wallace, you're already in the Army, so I recommend you link up with some folks who just graduated the M6 course and ask them how the job is, or what they'd rather be doing. BluetoGreen, the Army AMEDD life is not what it's cracked up to be. I mean the first two and a half years I was either in the woods, on a drop zone, or in the dessert, and everyday brought the promise of pain is some form or fashion; I thought to myself, I'm supposed to be working in a hospital. Now I work in a climate controlled office with a staff of civilians, and haven't seen hair nor hide of a drop zone, or the woods, or the dessert and everday brings the promise of starbucks...hey for $4 that coffe better be good, lol. I digress, the point is although everything seems peachy with my current job, I'd rather be back on the line, actually doing something that makes a difference. There is a serious lack of team work in the hospital, very little espirit de corps. You will meet some of the most unmotivated individuals, some of the most arrogant doctors and there's always that one civilian with the nasty attitude that they won't fire cause he/she has been working there for 100 years. I'm not saying don't pursue the medical field, if that's what you want to do, by all means, it can be a very rewarding career, just becareful and don't jump head first into anything, talk to people that do this day in and day out, and try to get an idea of what you will be doing. Alot of people in the Army say I joined to do "that" but I've been doing "this" since I've been in.
 
Posts: 580 | Registered: 29 January 2007Report This Post

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I too can not stress the importance of wanting to leave the MEDDAC enviroment enough. I run a clinic and I have since day one absolutely hated it. although this is great for career progression and all, dealing with civilians that do what they want, and unmotivated, lazy soldiers takes a toll on you. Not sayin that all MEDDAC's are this way, but that is a real reality in this world. As for M6 goes, it is a very demmanding program and I have a few friends that have attained that ASI. As for your reenlisting question, there is no telling, this is all based on the needs of the army at that point in time. i can tell you that they were and i do belive still are struggling for LPN's in the army. doesn't mean that it is going to be that way always. As for the two year thing, just be aware that if you enlist for 2 years the army still owns you for another 6 and i haven't meet one 68W that ets'ed that hasn't either been contacted or brought back to active duty on IRR. not saying that this will be a problem in your case, but a possibility.
 
Posts: 416 | Location: FT Monroe, VA | Registered: 17 March 2007Report This Post

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I love my job as a medic but I have been lucky enough not to be in a hospital. Being a "line medic" is alot better than being in clinic at a hospital. Also you can look into flight medic.
 
Posts: 8 | Location: ft bragg | Registered: 05 May 2009Report This Post

Picture of Bravo_232_68w
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well, since im a little farther along in the process ill give you a little of my opinion. im currently in the most intense company in 232 at fort sam, and im in my 13th week of 68w training. i grad 02jul09. what we learn here is how to be a "line medic". and this is where its at. i agree 100% with the previous medics advice, there is nothing better from what i can tell than being a line medic. plus a lpn is a bedpan changer, let's be real about it. combat medics, depending on how high speed you are and your relationship with your PA is, we do emergency chric's, other advance airway's, IO's, give all sorts of med's, every type of trauma health care etc. its to many to list. and we are the FIRST STAGE OF CARE! without the whiskey's our boys die! but if a CASH is where you wanna be, its your choice.


2nd July and I'm out of this place! then onto BIG RED ONE!
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Fort Sam Houston | Registered: 04 June 2009Report This Post

Picture of AutobahnSHO
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quote:
Originally posted by Bravo_232_68w:
im currently in the most intense company


yeah, that's what they all say. Big Grin


Be Proud of what you do- and do it Well! ~me
 
Posts: 5284 | Location: Ft Gordon (Again!!!) :-| | Registered: 22 October 2007Report This Post

Picture of willhorizontal
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Bravo_232_68w this is all based on your experience, right? Because our W1 qualified medics aren't even as full of themselves as you are. Anybody see a shovel? It's getting deep in here.
 
Posts: 131 | Location: Fort Huachuca, AZ | Registered: 12 March 2009Report This Post

Picture of AirborneDoc
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Hmm.. I didn't know you had to reenlist to be a M6. It was a enlistment option when I came in but that was eight years ago. Anyways, you should do the two years as a 68W and see what your options are. If you like the medical field you can stay in and get your M6 identifier, or go flight medic like me. Flight medic is pretty fun if you like flying in black hawks. But I'd have to say M6 would give you more advantage if you decide to get out.
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Classified | Registered: 22 October 2005Report This Post

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oh and you ain't a real "line medic" unless you've been downrange as a line dawg in an infantry unit. airborne!
 
Posts: 34 | Location: Classified | Registered: 22 October 2005Report This Post

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willhorizontal, how was what i said being "full of myself"? not that arguing with you wont be fun, but i was just informing the wannabe that being a 68w is a great job and you get to do highspeed stuff if you have a great relationshiop with your PA. its called stating facts. and i am going to W1 which is even more highspeed. just passing on info. you can take it up with cadre at 232 if you think i am giving the wrong info. keep shoveling. P.S. PROUD TO BE A 68W!!!


2nd July and I'm out of this place! then onto BIG RED ONE!
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Fort Sam Houston | Registered: 04 June 2009Report This Post

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Grief, gotta love the enthusiasm of IETers. Bravo, how's life as a motor pool medic these days? Is it as high speed as you thought in Whiskey Land?...didn't think so.

Anyone with questions, I'm a 68W10M6 stationed at Walter Reed AMC (District of Columbia). Here's what I'll say unofficially:

I enlisted to be a M6 and fast-tracked since I was an LVN in Texas before joining. Since completing whiskey school (68W) and being as enthusiastic as the seemingly-misguided recruit I went to an abbreviated M6 course (ok, so it was severely abbreviated to 2 weeks but like I said I was already licensed).

They have since removed the ability to initially enlist for the M6 option (or so I was told by my recruiter...famous words, right?) so the only way to get it is to already be a 68W from my understanding.

As a 68W you will have VERY FEW chances of getting out of the MOS, in fact your best chances are only if you are reenlisting for the 1st time, after that....good luck.

M6 is just an ASI, although there are chances of getting into a Combat Support Hospital (not CASH as was stated in a post above) or a Forward Surgical Team you are most likely to be allocated with Medical Center (MEDCEN) and what you do there is based on your assignment made during inprocessing. What does that mean? You can work ICU, Med-Surg, Pediatrics, E.R., or almost anywhere in the hospital (if you are a straight 68W...meaning no ASI's you will have more options on where you can work).

I recommend doing some serious soul searching (as applicable) before going into this 'black-hole' MOS (meaning you can't get out of it). Being a M6's not bad at all but doing what you do as a civilian in the same capacity wasn't what I thought being in the Army was about... Not to whine too much (gentlemen please pull out your violin's for this next statement) but I really joined to support our Army at war and although I do that to some small extent, it's not anywhere close to what I was hoping to do. Whereas people get surprised that 'Healthcare Specialist' usually means 'Combat Medic', I saw 'Combat Medic' and got 'Healthcare Specialist' for now. Good luck anyone looking into becoming one, it's worth doing if you want something that transfers to the civilian world of jobs when you get out.

Misc.:
For the record, there are very few times I've ever had patients that have used a bedpan Wink I guarantee you would rather them use the bedpan than the bed for those bodily functions!
 
Posts: 86 | Location: Camp Yongsan, South Korea | Registered: 04 December 2009Report This Post

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Take what these guys say with a grain of salt. I've done my time in the trenches, and don't enjoy being shot at, and I'm assuming you won't either. If you want to go into a nursing program for the army and already have a degree, talk to the recruiters. In most cases, a bachelor's degree is at least an "in" to getting a commission, and will get you further along in the educational process. While you won't have the field experience these guys do (which is valuable), you'll have an expanded knowledge base. Keep in mind though, I wasn't a medic when I was in...but in my experience, these guys will keep you alive until you get to a hospital. The job you're looking at happens after that, or in a preventative care environment.
 
Posts: 1 | Registered: 18 June 2012Report This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by SGT. T:
Be careful what you ask for fellaz. Wallace, you're already in the Army, so I recommend you link up with some folks who just graduated the M6 course and ask them how the job is, or what they'd rather be doing. BluetoGreen, the Army AMEDD life is not what it's cracked up to be. I mean the first two and a half years I was either in the woods, on a drop zone, or in the dessert, and everyday brought the promise of pain is some form or fashion; I thought to myself, I'm supposed to be working in a hospital. Now I work in a climate controlled office with a staff of civilians, and haven't seen hair nor hide of a drop zone, or the woods, or the dessert and everday brings the promise of starbucks...hey for $4 that coffe better be good, lol. I digress, the point is although everything seems peachy with my current job, I'd rather be back on the line, actually doing something that makes a difference. There is a serious lack of team work in the hospital, very little espirit de corps. You will meet some of the most unmotivated individuals, some of the most arrogant doctors and there's always that one civilian with the nasty attitude that they won't fire cause he/she has been working there for 100 years. I'm not saying don't pursue the medical field, if that's what you want to do, by all means, it can be a very rewarding career, just becareful and don't jump head first into anything, talk to people that do this day in and day out, and try to get an idea of what you will be doing. Alot of people in the Army say I joined to do "that" but I've been doing "this" since I've been in.


I believe the Sergeant above me said it better then I could have ever said it. Back to the line for me!


68W SPC
 
Posts: 14 | Registered: 16 February 2011Report This Post
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