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CIA - 35N vs. 35P?
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posted
Hello there! Hope everyone is well. I am a Chicago native and my reserved Army job is 35W (TS Security Clearance), which will lead to the MOS of 35N or 35P. I am leaving very soon actually. After Missouri for BT, I will be heading to the DLI in California for AIT to study my assigned language for a year. My lifelong ambition has always been to work in the CIA. Any insights as to which MOS, 35N or 35P, would be more helpful/respected knowing my future career aspirations?
 
Posts: 1 | Location: Chicago, IL | Registered: 09 February 2009Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Neither. Both are very relative to the mission of the NSA (i.e., a Signals Intelligence mission), not the CIA (Human Intelligence)

CIA doesn't have the authority (according to Executive Order 12333) to conduct SIGINT, just like NSA doesn't have the authority to conduct HUMINT.

So if you want a CIA job, you kinda picked the wrong MI MOS.
 
Posts: 345 | Location: Ft. Meade, MD | Registered: 08 August 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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He's right. 35N's and P's do SIGINT. CIA is HUMINT. 35M would be the MOS you'd want. That's not to say that it's impossible to get into the CIA just because you have a SIGINT background. Your language will help, especially if it's Middle Eastern, plus your clearance.
 
Posts: 6 | Registered: 23 December 2008Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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I've heard that post 9/11, a lot of public sector intelligence employees left for the private sector. This (reportedly) greatly compromised the CIA and left the bulk of intelligence work to the DoD (source: Ron Suskind).

Does anyone have other suggestions for prospective civil servants once they get out of the army?
 
Posts: 7 | Registered: 02 July 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Doesn't matter what MOS you have in the Army. You need a 4 year degree with a GPA of at least 3.0 or 3.5 depending on what job you want with them.
 
Posts: 25 | Registered: 17 June 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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Not only did you resurrect a thread that was over a year old (which was resurrected once already), but your information is bullshit and incorrect.


______________________________________________

"an Army Linguist" - Resources and more about being an Army linguist
 
Posts: 2481 | Location: CONUS | Registered: 30 October 2005Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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quote:
Originally posted by junxed:
Doesn't matter what MOS you have in the Army. You need a 4 year degree with a GPA of at least 3.0 or 3.5 depending on what job you want with them.


By your comment, I can establish two things.

1. You have never worked with anyone from that particular agency. 2. You have never been involved in the hiring process from that particular agency.
 
Posts: 36 | Registered: 03 October 2010Reply With QuoteReport This Post

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This thread is old but, The C.I.A, F.B.I and N.S.A need linguist. Go to the CIA website. They are seeking
linguist in specific languages. When I got out of the AF, I went to the CIA website. I looked at what they had written on their home page. In Persian aka Farsi. It was written in Farsi and it said, "If you can read this, contact us." There were other languages there also. Yes you need a degree. Your security clearance
from the military, will not help you get a job at the C.I.A or F.B.I. you still will be investigated. Not sure about N.S.A because when I worked at N.S.A there were civilians doing the same job I did. Most of them were prior military linguist. The F.B.I has what is called contract linguist. A degree is desirable but, being a experienced linguist from the military can be substituted for the degree. AKA job experience. You will be given the DLPT aka defence language proficiency test. To have a really good chance of getting the job, you need a 3,3,3"listening, reading and speaking." these are the highest scores you can get on the test because they only test you up to 3 on this particular test. on the DLPT yes you can score higher but, you are not tested above a 3. A 3, means you are near native in the 3 areas you are tested. The test score go 0, 0+, 1, 1+, 2, 2+ and 3. The 0+ to 1 means you are able to say things like, who you are, greetings. Very basic things with little mistakes. When you are at the 1+ scores mean, now you can hold a conversation with a person no subject specific and little mistakes. 2 means you can hold a conversation express yourself with little or no mistakes. 2+ you can express yourself and hold normal conversation without mistakes and able to speak about certain topics like, gun control etc with little or no mistakes. A 3, is now near native speaker. you can talk about specific topics etc. Example you now can read a farsi poem and understand what the writer was inferring. Or talk about rocket science. With no mistakes. The AF wanted you to be at level 2 when you graduated the basic language class at DLI, If you got less then 2 on the speaking portion, When I was at DLI
you would be given a waiver and on to crypto school you went. But, you would not be issued the Basic Linguist certificate. If you got 2+2+2+ you were issued a intermediate certificate and 333 Advance certificate. The best way to get the information you seek,IMHO is to contact the agency you want to work for and ask them. Do a web search for DLPT and you will see how many agencies use this test and it will give you more of a breakdown what the scores mean.
 
Posts: 2 | Location: Hot dessert | Registered: 25 November 2011Reply With QuoteReport This Post
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