another old question

ok ppls, I know someone will be able to help me here ... I got another one of the age old questions that causes heated debates.

got out of formation, and the PSG calls "fall out" ... as I was walking back to my office, I heard a SFC telling a SSG "you can only call dismissed once a day"

I didn't try to correct him, mainly cause I'm tired and I know how this SFC is. But it made me think ... since when? (these were the actual words that formed in my mind when I heard that)

I've already corrected an entire company of NCOs on the difference between fall out and dismissed (little long, maybe I'll tell it later), but this was something entirely new ...

so (he says about to pour gas on an open flame) when in formation, what is the proper time to call "fall out" and call "dismissed"?
Original Post
FM 3-21.5 CH 6-10
"NOTE: Unless otherwise stated (by the person in charge in his instructions before the command DISMISSED), the command DISMISSED terminates only the formation, not the duty day (AR 310-25). " It doesn't give much info (that I could find) about the use of "Fall out" other than it can be given, followed by Fall in, to change the position of a formation.(and in some other cases amounting to about the same thing)

AR 310-25 defines dismiss as "order a unit to break ranks after a drill, ceremony, or formation of any kind"

AR 310-25 defines Fall Out as "Leave a place in formation; Leave one position in a formation, but remain in the immediate vicinity. 3. Command permitting soldiers to leave their places in ranks but keeping them in the immediate vicinity."

I know we've all heard that "Fall in is used by the 1SGT at the first formation of the day and Fall out at the last" However FM 3-21.5 gives them as generic terms used to form and terminate a formation.

Hope this helps.

-Rob
I have always known dismissed to be used to dismiss a company from duty until the next formation. i.e. Use Dismiss on a friday end of day formation so all soldiers know they are dismissed for the weekend and to report for 0630 accountibility on Monday. Fall out is to be used to send soldiers to their place of duty until they are "dismissed" for the day or weekend. The only command I know of that is supposed to be used only once a day is "Fall In." Let me rephrase that....."Fall in" is to be used only once a day when forming the company and that is at the first formation of the day.

Of course, I'm only going off of what I've always been told. I haven't actually looked it up. I think I know what I am going to do today.
Before I start, be advised my info comes from 22-5 and pldc from 3 years ago, probably right but it could have changed.

Fall out is a rest position at the halt (like at ease or rest) but the soldiers must remain in the area because they are still in formation. The command dissmissed ends the formation (not the duty day)

This is a common D&C mistake, too many NCOs just repeat rumors. If you're going to make a correction, quote the doctrine.
Guess I was wrong----I'm glad I looked it up now though.......

Quote: "Unless otherwise stated (by the person in charge in his instructions before the command DISMISSED), the command DISMISSED terminates only the formation, not the duty day (AR 310-25)."

This came out of FM 3-21.5 Chapter 6 Paragraph 6-10
quote:
Reply

FALL IN has no limit on how many times a day you can use it.

FALL OUT requires you to remain in the vicinity of the formation, and is not a rest position. No limit on how many times a day you can use it.

DISMISSED allows you to leave the area of the formation and doesn't release you for the day. No limit on how many times a day you can use it.
Just brought this up to my company this morning and I'll admit, I repeat what I've heard in the past and when questioned this morning, I immediately began looking this up in the doctrine. I see this post is from quite a while ago however, I'm not seeing this in 'black and white' so unless someone can point me in a more noteworth direction, I'm leaning towards referring to this as here say.

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