Green to Gold Active Duty Option

Net call to all ADO applicants! Lets see where we stand!
I initially placed a scholarship option but decided to toss my hat in the ring of ADO heres my stats, I am wondering how I stack against others.

6 years TIS
SSG 2.5 years TIG
11B
NCO of the Year Brigade and Batt
1st place Batt physical competition
NCOERs 5 of 1/1
Distinguished Leader grad WLC
#39 of 219 ALC
1/1 Recruiting NCOER (1.5 years through detail)
299 PT score
118 GT
3.6 GPA
LOR from a previous BDE CDR -Colonel

Hopefully these are good enough stats. Do you guys think we will find out by end of April/May?
quote:
Originally posted by TheWiseChief:


If you are serious about these types of aspirations; why wait to the last minute to submit your packet?


Some of us had to update their transcripts with the 2015 Fall semester credits in them. The earliest you could have done that was probably early Jan, which snowballed into some things (academic worksheet, transfer credits sheet, PMS letter) being left for a rush. I was in the same boat.
quote:
Originally posted by kocka:
quote:
Originally posted by TheWiseChief:


If you are serious about these types of aspirations; why wait to the last minute to submit your packet?


Some of us had to update their transcripts with the 2015 Fall semester credits in them. The earliest you could have done that was probably early Jan, which snowballed into some things (academic worksheet, transfer credits sheet, PMS letter) being left for a rush. I was in the same boat.


This was the exact problem I ran into, they couldnt generate any forms without all my transcripts completed and submitted, then they were reluctant to admit me to the school before they were even closing the application process for other students. It was a difficult process, to say the least.
quote:
Originally posted by 11bis4me:
Net call to all ADO applicants! Lets see where we stand!
I initially placed a scholarship option but decided to toss my hat in the ring of ADO heres my stats, I am wondering how I stack against others.

6 years TIS
SSG 2.5 years TIG
11B
NCO of the Year Brigade and Batt
1st place Batt physical competition
NCOERs 5 of 1/1
Distinguished Leader grad WLC
#39 of 219 ALC
1/1 Recruiting NCOER (1.5 years through detail)
299 PT score
118 GT
3.6 GPA
LOR from a previous BDE CDR -Colonel

Hopefully these are good enough stats. Do you guys think we will find out by end of April/May?


11bis4me, those are great stats. I think you have a really good chance at getting selected. I sure do hope we find out in May. It seems like in previous years, selected candidates began to find out the first week of May. I can't take the anticipation, I just want it to be over with!
Well non-scholarship you have to get out of active duty (early release) plus you have to compete for active duty slot unless you want to go as an officer in the National Guard or Reserves.

Money is the only problem being non-scholarship especially if you are very competitive with your grades and PT. Obviously in ADO you are going back to active duty but, you have to compete to get one of your top three choices of branch in the Army.

GPA is 25% of your OML.


quote:
Originally posted by NapTime_05:
What is the non-scholarship option? Do you not get pay and benefits at all?
It is 30 days training with other cadets from other state. If they are giving 200 slots this year then you are golden. They would give ADO slot like candy this year.

Well the hardest part for me is money Frowner . Another disadvantage is getting out of active duty (no insurance/dental) unless you join national guard SMP Program (not GFRD if you want to compete going back to active duty) you can buy tricare select and metlife.

oh being in ADO you are 100% back in active duty after ROTC plus you have all benefits. The only thing you compete for is to get one of your top three branches in the Army.



quote:
Originally posted by Green2goldnewbie:
@ Mgaira

How long is your Sri Lanka trip?

I am considering non-scholarship option too if ADO doesn't work out.

From your experience so far, what is the advantage and disadvantage of non-scholarship besides money.
Thank you
Naptime_05,

Which waiver is your ROTC cdr refusing to sign? The waiver process seems to change every year. Also, both stats posted so far look pretty good, I would say you both stand good chances of getting ADO. I got it last year, as well as my 2 peers in my class, with similar stats.

People started getting notified early May last year. However, it's not like a regular board where results are posted and that's it; the results slowly trickle out. I needed 3 total waivers (age, TIS, and medical), so I didn't get officially accepted until all 3 were cleared. My notification finally came mid-June. My I started school 2 months later.
Naptime_05,

Also, have you contacted your POC at cadet command to see if that will affect your packet? When I submitted mine last year, I needed to submit copies of al requested waivers. For me, one was a 4187 and one was a memorandum. But cadet command still wanted copies of what I submitted as part of my packet, even though they weren't approved yet.
G2GMedic15, I am requesting waivers for civil conviction (11 years ago before I was in the Army,) dependency, TIS, and age. I have already submitted all waiver docs and 4187's. I only need the BDE CDR approval memorandum. I just spoke with my POC about it. He says it won't affect my chances of getting selected but, if could significantly slow down my waiver process which would limit my time for a PCS move. I am married with four children so, I am hoping to have a little bit of time to settle into our new home before I would have to begin school.

I'm trying to be optimistic about it. First, I just hope that the board selects me, then I will worry about getting these waivers approved.

quote:
Originally posted by G2GMedic15:
Naptime_05,

Also, have you contacted your POC at cadet command to see if that will affect your packet? When I submitted mine last year, I needed to submit copies of al requested waivers. For me, one was a 4187 and one was a memorandum. But cadet command still wanted copies of what I submitted as part of my packet, even though they weren't approved yet.
Finally got one last LOR from my old Division Commander who is now the CENTCOM chief of staff.... hopefully this helps!

G2GMEDIC, can you explain your pcs process, how you were notified, and if you were able to take regular pcs leave and what not? I am getting very anxious!!! Thankfully I am only going about 50 miles north of my current duty station, shouldn't be too hard to handle.

Has anyone heard about number of slots this year?
aQ, I don't see why you would. The DA330 wasn't on the checklist and I didn't upload mine.

quote:
Originally posted by aQ:
Hi everyone
i hope G2G ADO numbers are up this year.
Question, do you think I will need to upload my DA330 to my packet?
Thanks in advance.
Good luck everyone.
11bis4me,

The pcs process is normal, just expedited. You can take leave if you get selected, all waivers approved, and orders cut with enough time. I received notification of my selection and waiver approval all at once. What happened was they selected me, held on to the announcement until all of my waivers were approved (my TIS took the longest), and then sent me my official notice of selectionnvia email on 11 June in the afternoon, which was a Friday. Nothing could really happen until Monday. Of course, HRC has to put you on assignment, it cycles every week on Tuesday, so I wasn't officially on assignment until 30 June. From there, I had to start harassing my unit for my orders. My school started first week of August and report date on your orders is the day before your semester starts. So in 30 days, I had to get my orders cut, do transportation, clear CIF, set up my travel (since I was overseas), rush to get final signatures on my ncoer, etc. It was a nightmare. BUT I was able to take 5 days of leave to find somewhere to live at least before school started.
Yea, my status is now saying "boarded." I really hope the results are released quickly. I have heard speculation that the results will be out earlier than past years.


quote:
Originally posted by Green2goldnewbie:
@ Naptime, i believe that you are right and good luck.

Did you check your online status today?
I wanted to say good luck to everyone who applied this year for G2G. I was accepted last year for G2G ADO and I'm about to finish up my first year of grad school. Hopefully they accept more than 75 ado applicants this year. I have actually been living the life, even though ROTC can be really stupid at times. Good Luck everyone
quote:
Green2goldnewbie


I am in Statesboro, Ga attending Georgia Southern University. I am getting a graduate degree in Criminology. The program is okay, it's frustrating because these cadets think they know what the real Army is like just because they been to CLC. Many of the cadets here that are commissioning with me are lazy. I am so ready to graduate and get back to the real Army.
I agree with KB2588. ROTC is one of the more frustrating things I've ever done. It's like dealing with entitled privates who you have zero authority over. A lot of the cadets just see it as a way to pay for college without having to play "real army". They show up to pt when they want, if they want. They show up late to class, or on time, if they want. Then, like KB2588 said, they go to camp and think they know what the real army is like. Very frustrating. I'm ready to graduate and just get back to work. Don't get me wrong, the hours are nice, but the frustrations are a little too much for me. I'd rather work my crazy hours again lol
I just received a "Accepted conditionally: Medical". After dealing with DODMERB, they will not give me a waiver so j must get one from the Army. It is for astigmatism and hearing. Has anyone gone through this process and maybe she'd some light on what I should expect?
quote:
Originally posted by KB2588:
quote:
Green2goldnewbie


I am in Statesboro, Ga attending Georgia Southern University. I am getting a graduate degree in Criminology. The program is okay, it's frustrating because these cadets think they know what the real Army is like just because they been to CLC. Many of the cadets here that are commissioning with me are lazy. I am so ready to graduate and get back to the real Army.


That is how things are some times. Some ROTC graduates had a better experience depending on the school, CADRE, etc.

Before becoming a Warrant, I experienced ROTC and state OCS back in the day and you will find all types of cadets and candidates from lazy to cream of the crop. The thing is to remain focus on the prize and learn from the good and the bad.

This is a good news article about ROTC and it reaching its millennial.

http://www.armytimes.com/story...ry-success/85245732/
For 100 years, the United States Army has successfully combined the academic rigor of civilian education and the high standards of military training into a unified program — the Army Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, or ROTC.

President Woodrow Wilson signed the National Defense Act of 1916, creating ROTC, and providing the leadership foundation for more than half-a-million second lieutenants over the past century to serve in the Regular Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard. The Army we’ve all come to know today would not exist as it does without the College and University ROTC program.

ROTC draws from the American well, representing the full fabric of the nation, with nearly 300 programs dispersed across all 50 states, including Guam and Puerto Rico. ROTC is also largely responsible for propelling the Army forward toward inclusion and diversity. This fusion of varied geographical backgrounds, ethnicities, religions, and career fields has contributed to making the United States Army a leadership powerhouse, and the most dominate land force the world has ever known.

The ROTC lineage is rich with trailblazers who set the path for the Army’s current success. For many, ROTC was the bridge between small beginnings and realized dreams. For me, it began on the campus of Virginia State University during the spring of my sophomore year. Virginia State introduced me to a world of endless possibilities; however, ROTC was the door to that new world. Now more than 35 years later, I am beyond humbled to stand alongside tremendous leaders, both in uniform and in the corporate sector, who also walked through the ROTC door

Gen. George C. Marshall, Jr., led the way and was the first officer with ROTC roots. Preceding the formal creation of ROTC, he graduated from the Virginia Military Institute in 1901 and received a commission as a second lieutenant. General Marshall became the Army’s Chief of Staff on the same day that World War II began in Europe. Following his retirement from the Army, Gen. Marshall went on to win the Noble Peace Prize and serve as both Secretary of Defense and Secretary of State. Gen. Marshall set the standard for the thousands of officers who followed his footsteps to professional military education.

Another trailblazer, retired Gen. Colin Powell, the son of Jamaican immigrants, was the first African-American to serve as U.S. Secretary of State and the first African-American to serve as Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. General Powell found his calling through the ROTC program at the City College of New York. When asked by National Public Radio what would have been his career choice outside of the Army, he simply responded, “I’d probably be a bus driver.”

Other distinguished ROTC graduates went on to serve in senior military assignments including former Chiefs of Staff of the Army Gen. George Casey, Gen. Peter Schoomaker, Gen. Gordon Sullivan, Gen. Fred Weyland, and Gen. George Decker, former Commander of U.S. Army Forces Command, Gen. Larry Ellis.

Read more at http://www.armytimes.com/story...ry-success/85245732/

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