I refuse to lie at MEPS, but do I even have a shot?

Hi everyone. I'm brand new to this forum, so please excuse all my new-ness.

I fully plan on enlisting this coming summer, after I have completed high school. (Currently 18, HS senior).

I was hospitalized in November for drinking, and had to get my stomach pumped etc, and it was brought to light in my family that I was bulimic. I went to treatment in mid-January, and was discharged in mid-March.
As I've said, I refuse to be dishonest and lie MEPS because I know they would eventually find out anyway, and I don't want to start my career in the US Army off with a lie, or end it with a dishonorable discharge.

Since I've been treated successfully, and now could pass any psych eval with flying colors, is there any sort of chance I could get a waiver? I know everything I've stated is disqualifying, but I'm curious. An Army Officer friend of mine (first lieutenant) told me that I shouldn't tell them because they wouldn't find out, but I don't like the idea of lying.

I don't want anyone to sugar-coat anything, just let me know if I have any sort of a shot.
Original Post
Honestly, it's a bad idea to lie. It's very likely that they will find the information anyway.

Additionally, I think that you need to think long and hard about what this decision will mean for your recovery. The military has fairly strict weight guidelines and you will be weighed in front of coworkers at least twice a year for the duration of your career.

I've seen weight issues cause stress for many women and I wouldn't want to see someone who has has already had issues be unprepared.
Right now the timing is not great- in 2006 they were taking almost anyone. (Wartime has a lot of people saying, "no way!")

It's worth a shot- if one recruiter won't help you then find another.

Agree with SFC W- and she is an accomplished Soldier. Wink
I would add that the weight standards are QUITE strict. The average American wouldn't cut it on a regular basis..
thank you both so much for the input, its much appreciated. as for my body image, its currently good. I would like to believe that being in the army would keep me on the right path in my recovery, as I would assume its damn near impossible to have an eating disorder in the military. I'm not currently underweight either, and I'm not having any difficulty maintaining.

I'm going to try to contact my uncle, who is a retired Colonel. I think he'll be able to help me find the right recruiter. I believe I would be a pretty good asset to the US Army, and I'm willing to work my ass off to get in.

All other input is welcome. Thanks.
quote:
Originally posted by AllGetOut:
thank you both so much for the input, its much appreciated. as for my body image, its currently good. I would like to believe that being in the army would keep me on the right path in my recovery, as I would assume its damn near impossible to have an eating disorder in the military. I'm not currently underweight either, and I'm not having any difficulty maintaining.
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Be careful there- the Army can get VERY VERY STRESSFUL. Definitely not impossible to have eating disorder- and many people get kicked out because they are Overweight.

Underweight can still be a problem because it can be hard to stay hydrated, you also can have issues with being hungry and/or having enough energy stored for long periods of work.

-- I am an underweight male. Came in very very lightweight, Basic Training was brutal for me! Three square meals per day at the Dining Facility but the last was at 5pm. No candy machines or fast food or other food available. I was a snacker and it KILLED ME to not be able to eat at night!

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