Situational Questions

I meant to ask, How do I prepare myself for situational questions? I mean if I don't know an answer I would like to answer with situational answers instead of looking stupid, Leadership is a great situational section because I can't remember everything it says in the chapter. Also instead of the board members looking for answers, what else are they looking for? I have won Soldier of the Year for 121st Combat Support Hospital and lost the Soldier of Year for 65th Medical Brigade and would like to higher my knowledge for boards like those and regional boards. stupid
quote:
Originally posted by shine760:
How can we be prepair ourselves for situational questions like that, because I myself need to work that

Thank You
quote:
Originally posted by shine760:
How can we be prepair ourselves for situational questions like that, because I myself need to work that

Thank You


You either know it or you dont...dont think too much about the question...if they ask you something you dont know then you dont know it...as NCOs we dont know everything but we will get you in the right direction...I was asked more situational questions for my SGT board than my SSG Board...stuff like curtailments and extensions (i was working at G1 in Korea), and stuff related to my job....
I'm actually in Korea now sergeant! also I would like to know, is it better to respond with, "CSM I don't know this answer right after he asks the question if I don't know it but I do know it but I have to think about it?
quote:
Originally posted by TransAm95NCO:
quote:
Originally posted by shine760:
How can we be prepair ourselves for situational questions like that, because I myself need to work that

Thank You


You either know it or you dont...dont think too much about the question...if they ask you something you dont know then you dont know it...as NCOs we dont know everything but we will get you in the right direction...I was asked more situational questions for my SGT board than my SSG Board...stuff like curtailments and extensions (i was working at G1 in Korea), and stuff related to my job....
Have lots of other NCOs ask you questions. Read the questions on this forum.

You should think of doing the right thing to help the Soldier while following Army rules and above all, safety!

You really can't give the 100% right answer every time, and DON'T say "I don't know" to those types.
The key to situational questions is to answer the question how YOU would handle the situation not the BOOK ANSWER. To answer situational Questions you should have a great knowledge of what programs and service are available on your installation.

Basic one:

After redeployment, one of your troops comes to formation late, smelling of alcohol and obviously upset, what do you do?

Your 1st "book" answer would be to take him the MP station and have him blow, but come on you just spent 12 months downrange with the guy, is it out of character yes or no? if it is out of character you would obviously pull him aside and get to the bottom of it before frying the guy.

These are the good ones to practice.
How would you go about answering a question if you don't know the answer to? I am used to saying "1SG I don't know this answer at this time" but if I knew the AR or FM I would tell them where I can find it. I understand "I don't know" is a bad idea. anyone have any suggestions?
Dont say "I dont know" if you can avoid it...but say something like "I would need to so some research" or "I dont know the exact answer but I would start by looking into this regulation or calling this office (ACS, AER or something like that)

Sometimes, I dont know is all you can say...I went to my SSG board in Recruiting world...I answered ALL questions right, until I got to the last 1SG, he says "you want 1 hard question or 5 easy", before I could answer he said "ok, 1 hard one" and asked me something about the Recruiting badge...i didnt know it, so I said "I dont know at this time"...walked out with 150 points...he wanted to show me that no matter what you wont know everything...said he has never maxed anyone out at a board, I was the first...
will practice that, so it really doesn't matter what you know as long as we are firm and look confident. Thank You!
quote:
Originally posted by TransAm95NCO:
Dont say "I dont know" if you can avoid it...but say something like "I would need to so some research" or "I dont know the exact answer but I would start by looking into this regulation or calling this office (ACS, AER or something like that)

Sometimes, I dont know is all you can say...I went to my SSG board in Recruiting world...I answered ALL questions right, until I got to the last 1SG, he says "you want 1 hard question or 5 easy", before I could answer he said "ok, 1 hard one" and asked me something about the Recruiting badge...i didnt know it, so I said "I dont know at this time"...walked out with 150 points...he wanted to show me that no matter what you wont know everything...said he has never maxed anyone out at a board, I was the first...
quote:
Originally posted by shine760:
will practice that, so it really doesn't matter what you know as long as we are firm and look confident.


Exactly.

The board is a test of your willpower and overall bearing, not just knowledge. From the first knock on the door, to your salute and about face at the end.
Situational questions provoke us to come up with better responses than "I don't know but I'll get back to you".

Use your knowledge of the military system, the UCMJ, your personal experiences of good leadership, and then make an educated response.

In the case of the soldier asking about slaughtering an animal you would:

- Show an immediate interest in the soldier.
- Ask the soldier for clear reasons why they wish to do this, have they done this before, who approved it and why.
- Clarify the relgious beliefs of the soldier. Is there an organization or church that performs this action off post already that the soldier can attend to mitigate the issue without it becoming a problem.
- Seek clarification from higher: Chaplain, company commander for their understanding of the request
- Follow up with the soldier in a timely manner and if it is not approved, provide counseling to the soldier explaining why the request was not approved and what their options are.

None of this is complex, it is just about using your people skills and good judgement.
I hope these also help...

Q: Greenville, Texas claims Audie as a hometown hero. Name four other towns that claim the same?

Q: Audie was one of many children to Emmett and Josie Murphy. Name two of Audie's siblings?

Q: When Audie was finally allowed to join the Army he enlisted in this Texas town?

Q: What medals had Audie earned by the time he made "Buck" Sergeant?

Q: Audie was always kinda embarrassed about earning a particular award/medal/badge. Which one and why?

Q: What is unique/amazing/unusual about the two Silver Stars Audie was awarded?

Q: Audie was wounded three times resulting in three Purple Hearts. Describe the wound(s) or event(s) for the three medals?

Q: Audie's Medal of Honor actions occurred in which country?

Q: As a 1st Lieutenant, Audie was almost court-martialed for what re-occurring infraction?

Q: Because of his actions during World War II, Audie was offered an appointment to West Point. Why didn't he go?

Q: Guiding a squad/unit thru unfamiliar territory is always done by an NCO or by an Officer. Why should we continue to teach map reading to Basic Trainees?

Q: We all know what "NBC" stands for. We know which regs cover it. With no chance of nuclear warfare in sight, why does the Army still train for nuclear consequences?

Q: You're on duty as Battalion Staff Duty NCO, on Sunday, in the middle of August. Your Officer is at dinner. A young soldier approaches you, lays PCS orders on the desk and announces he's been assigned to Fort Sill. He's out of gas, broke, hungry, and his wife, 3 kids and the family dog are waiting in the car. What do you do?
I just read that last question last night in the Mentor book.
1) Make arrangements for them to stay in on-post lodging if possible, arranging to defer payment until the following day.
2) Determine if they have access to an ATM to try to reduce the money problem
3) If billeting will not take the dogs and no boarding place is available attempt to coordinate with other members of the unit.
4) Get the soldier settled as soon as possible.
5) If the monney problem cannot be resolved contact the chain of command, who may be able to work something out with AER or the chapl) ain.
6) See if he has a sponsor, and if they do, contact them and notify him/her that the family is here.
7) See if there is a "slush" fund at the SD desk. If there is, "loan" the soldier some funds so that he and his family can at least eat.
Good job, manosax!

That kind of multiple-scenario question is good for making a candidate think. It doesn't matter if you can memorize reg numbers if you can't get a soldier to the services the regs describe.

The last thing a board wants to hear is that you'll invite them over to your house and feed them for the night.

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