The Truth about 68V?

I've been out of the Army of 12 years now, and I'm wanting to enlist again. The MOS that looks the most attractive to me is 68V Respiratory Specialist.

However, I'm reading a lot of conflicting info online. I would really appreciate answers from someone who knows.

Do you have to be currently Active or Reserve E-5 or higher?

What ARE the requirements?

Do you really graduate 68V with an Associates Degree?

How long are Phase 1 and Phase 2 of training, and is Phase 2 also at Ft. Sam?

How difficult is it to get this MOS when you join - how often do these slots come available?

Thanks for your help.
Original Post
Stop reading dated info on About.com Furthermore, I had to give up my promotable status as an E-5 to become eligible to attend the 68V school this 15th of Aug. The requirements are listed on the MOS book on www.armyreenlistment.com .......if you can not find then through your own search after I gave you that info...then...candidly you should not be on my team....(after all I am not CPT America and I found them). You do receive an Associates IF you had the previous credentials listed on the website, which are ENG . and Humanities, if you have to ask then you don't have them. I know total training is 10 months at Ft. Sam. I am here now with my family as it IS a PCS move. VERY DIFFICULT to get this MOS since I would not be eligible if I did not have an Associates prior to entering the Army. I Re-upped for it and had to wait 1.3 years for the school. There are routinely 2-3 classes a year for it, with a high wash out rate. If all criteria is met I look forward to having you on my team someday.
Thanks, Corvette.

I had come across that AMEDD listing in my search, but it was difficult to know whether or not that information was current. It's a fairly crappy web site that doesn't appear too well maintained. In fact there are a lot of dead links on these Army sites I've been searching, so despite one's due diligence it can be difficult to trust these web sites, and we all know that it can be difficult to trust your own recruiter. That's why I'm asking here - not because I'm some incompetent boob.

So you were already Active and re-enlisted for this MOS? My situation is different - thus all the questions. Interesting that there is a high wash-out rate. Maybe their ASVAB standards aren't high enough? If that's the case, you'd think they'd train more often, unless the need isn't that great. Having been a 91B (now 68W) and a Licensed Massage Therapist, I've a very good grounding in A&P, and medical terminology already, so I'm sure I could pass this course by working hard to learn what I don't already know.

I'd still love to get more answers from those who have them. Has anyone enlisted for the first time and gotten the 68V MOS? What were the pre-requisites for you? I assume they may be different than they are for someone who is re-enlisting.
I am currently on recruiting duty, so I can answer your question. As a prior service applicant trying to get back in you will not be able to enlist as a 68V. Because you have been out for 12 years you'll come back in as an E-1. You will also be limited to certian MOS's, basically needs of the Army. Other factors to consider are your age and how much active duty time you already have. These days we're telling prior service applicants that unless they are just enlisting for benefits and a paycheck, we will not work with them.
Thanks,68W2P. What are my MOS options? I don't mind being E-1 again. I'm just not sure if my wife will agree to this unless the MOS has a VERY low likelihood of putting me in harm's way.

My age is 36 about to turn 37 on 10/14. I was originally in for 2 years Active.

Thanks for your help.
I'm not sure where all this info came from. The 68V's that just started in August are all receiving their associates and will be CRT's when they complete this course. I am currently going through phase II of 68V school and we are the last class not to get an associates or CRT upon completion. So, from now on, the beginning of the 68V schooling will include all ENG and HUM's so that everyone will qualify for CRT upon completion.

The washout rate isn't as high as he made it out to be. We started phase I with 20 army and 7 navy. Two army soldiers failed out by failing more than 6 tests. One navy was kicked out for cheating. So we went from 27 down to 24. Don't get me wrong, the workload is tough and if you don't study you will not be successful. We were having a test every other day for a few weeks.

As far as re-enlisting, it all depends on what is available. I got out in 2004 and joined back in 2009 in this MOS. Just go to a recruiter and see if they have this option available. It is a great school and I'm enjoying all the training. Don't give up on the MOS just yet.
So I have a question. What can I do now to get myself ready for this class? I really want to start studying now. I'm sure you have to know the Anatomy of a human body and all that type stuff but what else? And am I going to be living in barracks or can I live in a house due to me having a family?
If you go to this website, it will show some of the classes you will be taking and a little introduction about each. When I went to the course Jan-09-Oct 09 we had7 soldiers fail out of the course, with two of them being from phase II. I did not recieve my degree at the school house, but I do know that they have changed that. Anybody looking ot get a heads up should get an Egan's Fundamentals of Respiratory Care, below are some other useful sites, about state licensing, requirements,

http://www.aarc.org/
http://www.nbrc.org/
http://www.ketteringseminars.com/
http://www.asthmaeducators.org/index.htm
http://www.rcjournal.com/
Yes CLEP'ing course will suffice for the 68V schoolhouse, I would recommend getting with your re-up NCO and seeing if anything has changed. I know the website has not been updated since I went though in 09, and they just changed the course.
Let me clarify a few questions that I've read on this site. I am an instructor for the Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program (aka 68V course) as well as the Director of Clinical Education. I've been with the program as a civilian instructor since 2004 and prior to that I retired as a 91V after 22 years in the Army.
The only prerequisites for this program are English I (Composition) and a college Humanities course. CLEP is acceptable.
The length of the program is 44 weeks for the Army and 32 weeks for the Navy. Why the difference? The Navy must arrive with English I and II, Humanities, College Math, and a Social Science course. Therefore, they do not attend the first 8 weeks of college classes (Eng II, Psychology, and Math taught by faculty from Thomas Edison State College). The next 4 weeks are General Medical Orientation for Army students. Believe it or not, the vast majority of Army students are from non-medical MOS's and need to be brought up to speed on healthcare topics like A&P, Microbiology, Medical Terminology, Growth and Development, Health Communications, BLS, and Basic Patient Assessment. The Navy are all hospital corpsmen when they arrive, so they are exempt from this part. The next 16 weeks are didactic RT courses followed by 16 weeks of clinical. Before you graduate, you will take the NBRC certification exam (at our expense). In a nutshell, if you apply yourself and successfully meet all our evaluations, you will leave Fort Sam Houston with an Associate's Degree in Applied Science in Respiratory Therapy from Thomas Edison State College and be a Certified Respiratory Therapist. On top of that, you can take the Registered Respiratory Therapist exam right away, since we have been approved as an advanced level Respiratory Therapy Program by the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care (CoARC). Not a bad deal, when you think about it.
If you have any other questions about the program, feel free to post it here and I will answer them as soon and as often as I can. That way, more people can benefit from the exchange of information. Best of luck!

Oscar Lopez-Martinez, MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Wow I did not know that, I finished the school house in 09, and with that and being CRT, can I to sit for the RRT without waiting the 2 years, or having my BAS. If so, that is great news, I am currently scheduled to attend the CCATT course at WPAFB, Oh and would to do the RRT after that.

AWESOME NEWS!
I'm sorry but you graduated from the entry-level course. That course no longer exists. Only students that graduate from the advanced level program are eligible to take the RRT immediately upon graduation (provided they passed the CRT first). Sorry to burst your bubble. Don't give up, though. Time flies and before you know it, you'll be eligible. So far, every one of our graduates that have become eligible for the RRT have passed it. And they were in the same entry-level course as you!
Good morning Mr. Lopez, it's good to have a representative from the program on the site. I'm currently an AD Medic and am looking to reclass to 68V. If I have all of the college prerequisites in addition to my being a Medic would I be eligible to be on the 32 week program that the Navy students participate in?
Hi PVT Harris,

I'm glad that I can be of some help to soldiers and sailors out there trying to find accurate and reliable information about our program.

Although I know that it makes absolute sense for Army students who are medics and have all the general education requirements to come in with the Navy, we don't have it set-up that way yet. Believe me, it's been a battle just trying to get where we are so far. If you've been in the military for a day or two, you will understand.

My recommendation to you is this: if you really want this MOS, apply now so you can get in as soon as possible. The gen ed classes will be a review for you and the general medical classes will reinforce your medical knowledge. Our classes have more of a college feel to them and the topics are very different than those you had going through 68W school.

Perhaps we'll have an avenue for applicants like you in the future, but for now we have to work with what we've got.

Thanks for the question. I know others will benefit from it.

OLM
c.garrett2,

Of all of the requirements to get accepted into the program, this one is low on the list of importance and I wouldn't let it stop you from applying. However, not having the promotable status will certainly put you at a disadvantage when there are more applicants than available seats. Applicants who meet ALL requirements will be given preference.

If you meet eligibility to go before the promotion board, I encourage you to do so. It looks like there will be quite a wait before a seat is available in the program.

Good luck.
Oscar Lopez-Martinez MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program Medical Education & Training Campus
Fort Sam Houston, TX
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Office: (210) 808-3781
Fax: (210) 808-3771
I forgot the other part of the question: Yes, this is a PCS move. The program is 44 weeks long and you will be required to PCS from your current duty station. Some students bring their families and find apartments wherever they can. Housing on base is limited and I don't know what the waiting list is like. That is something you can find out through your Housing Office. Other students elect to leave their families where they are or maybe with other family. Some spouses don't want to leave a job or take the kids out of school just to have to do it again in 44 weeks. That decision is totally up to the student. Keep in mind that the program is very challenging and requires sacrifice from the student and the family members. The rewards, though, are worth it.

OLM
LZ RRT,

As an RRT, you will not be required to go through the program and should have the MOS awarded to you. I have seen it done before.I'm not an expert in this area but I'm guessing that the only barrier to getting the MOS is if it is in the overstrength category. I would talk to a recruiter or career counselor to get the ball rolling. I'm assuming you're talking about active duty. If you want to stay in the Reserves, you can talk to them about finding you a reserve 68V slot.

Best of luck!

OLM
Mr. Lopez,
I'm looking to re class for the fiscal year 2015 with the class starting OCT 3 2014 is there any openings for this time frame that you may know of? I meet all the pre requisites and will be working with a career counselor next month as my DEROS is preventing me from applying now. Thank you for your response
Michael,

You are doing the right thing by working with your CC. We do not control the slots for the program. That is all done by HR. All we do is provide the requirements for admission.
Go to our official website (www.metc.mil/academics/irtp) for more information. Make sure you send an official copy of your transcripts to the Thomas Edison State College address under the "policies" tab.If TESC blesses off on your ENG Comp I and Humanities, you'll be a step ahead.

Good luck.

Oscar Lopez-Martinez MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program
Medical Education & Training Campus
Fort Sam Houston, TX
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Office: (210) 808-3781
Fax: (210) 808-3771
Got it thanks
That's good advice and a quick response.
With the slot being so far out i'm confident i'll be able to get one. "It looks like quite a wait before a seat is available in the program" from a the post in 2012 from someone who works at the school house had me questioning if i'd get a slot.
This is the best transitional opportunity I've seen in the military. With the current in and out calls this is a shortage MOS.
Thanks for the help see you soon!
Mr. Lopez,
Quick question i'm sure you can help. I've ordered my transcripts and my Humanities class is SPAN100. Also my English is ENG101. I was reading the pre-requisites and at this site http://www.soc.aascu.org/pubfi...r/DegPln_68V_AAS.pdf from Thomas Edison State College they state they do not accept "SPEECH" classes as a Humanities elective. Does this mean SPAN100. Also on the ATTRS website they say ENG101 must be evaluated to ensure they meet the pre-requisite. I know I need to send my transcript to Thomas Edison in reference to this program but i'm waiting on it in the mail. Do you think that the courses i've completed will qualify me for entrance into the program? Thanks i'm just ready to submit my packet and get out of my current MOS. I've also reviewed the degree program and it is very informative thanks for the response.
Michael,

Your questions can only be answered by Thomas Edison State College. The degree is awarded through them and they have to make sure that the courses you bring from other colleges meet their standards. Otherwise, their accreditation is jeopardized.
I recommend that you wait until the transcripts are evaluated (the preferred way is to have your college send the transcripts directly to the TESC address that is on the link you attached in your message...the one that has Mr. Louis Martini's name on it). If you need to take another course to meet the pre-requisite, then take the course. There really is no other option.

Good luck.

Oscar Lopez-Martinez MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program
Medical Education & Training Campus
Fort Sam Houston, TX
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Office: (210) 808-3781
Fax: (210) 808-3771
Mr. Lopez-Martinez,

First, I'd like to thank you for providing good input on this course. I am very excited about trying to get in, and hopefully the HRC Gods are in a good mood.

Sent you an email a few minutes ago to your .mail.mil address (didn't realize you still were staying up-to-date on this post, but thanks for doing so!). It looks like all my questions were answered though. Now I just have to knock out some of those Thomas Edison courses and I'll be golden. With my GT/ST score requirement met as well I should be competitive for a slot in the coming years!
Everyone,

There has been a change in the educational pre-requisites for the Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program (68V). Thomas Edison State College will now accept a general education course in lieu of the Humanities course.

Examples are:

Humanities
Art
Communications
Dance
Film
Foreign Language
Journalism
Literature
Music
Philosophy
Photography
Radio & Television
Religion
Speech
Theater Arts
Writing (advanced)

Social Sciences
Anthropology
Archaeology
Cultural Geography
Economics
History
Labor Studies
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology

Natural Science / Mathematics
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Computer Sciences* * not to include Data Processing or Computer Literacy
Environmental Science
Geology
Mathematics
Meteorology
Oceanography
Physical Geology
Physics


English Comp I with a "C" or better from a regionally accredited college is still required.

Any questions, please ask.

Oscar Lopez-Martinez MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program
Medical Education & Training Campus
Fort Sam Houston, TX
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Office: (210) 808-3781
Fax: (210) 808-3771
Thank you for the update Mr. Lopez. I am very interested in reclassing as a 68v, and was worried about the college courses. I have taken biology, so I guess an English class is something I should be focusing on.

I am deployed right now, an 11b E-5, and have sustained an injury that has landed me on admin duties for the remainder of our tour. When I get back I have to go through the mar2 and will be forced to reclass due to having a PULHES score of 2 on my lower body. Hopefully I can work with my career counselor to get into this field, but he isn't the most driven person I know to say the least.

If you have any information or links pertaining to my situation I would appreciate anything.

Thanks again.
More information can be found on our official website:

www.metc.mil/academics/irtp

You can also visit the ATRRS website:
https://www.atrrs.army.mil/atrrscc/course.aspx

Look for schools number 083 and 830, Medical Education Training Campus (METC) and Brook Army Medical Center (BAMC), Ft Sam Houston. Those are phase I and II of our course. You can view school dates and the pre-requisites. Remember that the Humanities pre-requisite has changed as mentioned in my previous message.


Oscar Lopez-Martinez MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program
Medical Education & Training Campus
Fort Sam Houston, TX
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Office: (210) 808-3781
Fax: (210) 808-3771
Mr. Lopez
Just updating the board and have one more question. I'm glad to announce I've been slotted for the Jan 30 2015 class at Ft. Sam Houston. I've began to take anatomy and physiology to prepare. Also have been referenced to Egans. Ed 10
What other things could be helpful in preparing for this course?
Michael,

Congratulations on getting a seat in our program.Taking the A&P course will be very useful. There are a couple of recommendations I can make to help you get prepared.
1) Go to your nearest hospital and speak with the Director/NCOIC of the Respiratory Therapy department. Let them know what you're doing and ask if you can follow an RT for a few hours to see what they do. Preferably someone who has graduated recently from our program (it has changed a lot in the lat 4 years). Check out the equipment they use, medicines, etc.
2) Go on Youtube and look up respiratory diseases (asthma, emphysema, chronic obstructive lung disease, pneumonia, pulmonary fibrosis, cystic fibrosis, etc.) and learn as much as you can about them. There are many excellent instructional videos/channels available.
3) Unless you find a good copy of 10th edition Egan's at a bargain price, I don't recommend you buy one. They are pricey (about $110 on Amazon) and we provide it for you when you get here (borrowed-we have to take it back when you finish...it's a budget thing). You may wind up buying one later on if you are the kind of student who highlights a lot and makes notes on the textbooks (can't do that to our books...sorry). In my opinion, it's not really practical to start reading through it this far away from your start date. Egan's is a difficult book to read (not saying you can't understand it...it just assumes you know certain information and builds from there).
4) Take care of any personal issues that you may have so that you won't have distractors competing for your attention. This program is intense, challenging, and very fast paced. You need to have all your attention focused on it.

That pretty much sums it up.

Best of luck and will see you when you get here.

Oscar Lopez-Martinez MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program
Medical Education & Training Campus
Fort Sam Houston, TX
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Office: (210) 808-3781
Fax: (210) 808-3771
This is for Oscar Lopez
Well or anyone inside this mos!

Hello I am wondering about this mos. I read that you can receive an associates degree from this mos. My concern is, how will that work if I already have a bachelors degree or have taken those general studies classes already? Will I still have to take the English, Math, Humanities?
Hey Mr. Lopez,

I E-mailed you several times back in November asking about the 68V schooling and what all went into it. I got approved last week for the 30 JAN 2015 class! I had read somewhere (can't remember where exactly) that Phase II was completed at a seperate location other than Ft. Sam Houston. Is this true? My ATTRS course reservation says Phase II will completed at Ft. Sam Houston so I was just curious.

Thank You

Parker
apfrutig,

Phase II training is conducted at San Antonio Military Medical Center (aka Brooke Army Medical Center) which is adjacent to Ft Sam Houston.In addition, students will train in other civilian hospitals in the city in order to expand their clinical experience.

Oscar Lopez-Martinez, MAEd, RRT, CPFT
Director of Clinical Education
Interservice Respiratory Therapy Program Medical Education & Training Campus
Fort Sam Houston, TX
oscar.lopez-martinez.civ@mail.mil
Office: (210) 808-3781
Fax: (210) 808-3771

Add Reply

Likes (0)
×
×
×
×