Veteran's preference: ever use it?

Hey, I got in March 05 then took the civil service exam here in MASS. the civil service exam is good for EMT/Police/Fire dept. if you are a Veteran you will usullay be on top of non-veteran, if you are a D-Veteran you are on top of Veterans and non-Veterans, thats here in MA, now some States give you points if pass the exam for example if get an 80 they night give 5 to 10 extra points New York does this, some other states just the fact the you are a Veteran can you a State or Goverment job faster the other people. civil service jobs always have a Human Resources Div so contact the about your plans.
Army SPC Luis O.
I have used veteran's preference to get my jobs with the federal government. I work on the base and this is my 2nd job where veteran's preferance along with my experience has helped me. Of course I receive the 10 point preference because I am more than 30% disabled. I would recommend that you visit the VA and try to get disability if you haven't done so yet. The 10 point preference really does make a difference!!!
Hi. I am a federal employee working for the ROTC program at Missouri State University. I used my vet pref when applying for this job. GREAT tool to use. Can only be used in certain cases though. Depends on whether you have a campaign under your belt or not. Must be able to prove it also. IE: DD 214, ERB, ORB, etc.
Feel free to email me at mikesimpson@missouristate.edu with any questions. I have a lot of resources ut don't want to put them on here and have it considered spamming or whatever.
quote:
Originally posted by /elsinore98:
Just wondering if anyone here has ever used veteran's preference in an attempt to get a state or federal govt. job...? Thanks.


Yes, I used it. Didn't do any good because the position wasn't hiring. I also used veteran's preference in several civilian positions.

The way it works:

Federal positions give you points for each category, i.e. vet pref, job exp, education...etc.

Civilian positions take your vet pref into consideration during the interview stage...if they consider vet pref at all...it's not a requirement for them.

I received vet status during Desert Storm. Although I did deploy, deployment was not a requirement for vet status. If you have National Defense Service Metal on your DD-214 then you have vet status.

Hope this helps.
quote:
Originally posted by Navar:
quote:
Originally posted by /elsinore98:
Just wondering if anyone here has ever used veteran's preference in an attempt to get a state or federal govt. job...? Thanks.


Yes, I used it. Didn't do any good because the position wasn't hiring. I also used veteran's preference in several civilian positions.

The way it works:

Federal positions give you points for each category, i.e. vet pref, job exp, education...etc.

Civilian positions take your vet pref into consideration during the interview stage...if they consider vet pref at all...it's not a requirement for them.

I received vet status during Desert Storm. Although I did deploy, deployment was not a requirement for vet status. If you have National Defense Service Metal on your DD-214 then you have vet status.

Hope this helps.


That's an innacuracy. I have that award on my DD 214 when I was released from Active Duty and I don't qualify for it. You have to have a total of 180 days on Active Duty in support of OIF, OEF, etc. You can get the ribbon without doing the 180 days.

quote:
Who Is Entitled To Veterans’ Preference In Employment?

Five-point preference is given to those honorably separated veterans (this means an honorable or general discharge) who served on active duty (not active duty for training) in the Armed Forces:

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during any war (this means a war declared by Congress, the last of which was World War II);
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during the period April 28, 1952, through July 1, 1955;
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for more than 180 consecutive days, any part of which occurred after January 31, 1955, and before October 15, 1976;
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during the Gulf War period beginning August 2, 1990, and ending January 2, 1992; or
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for more than 180 consecutive days, any part of which occurred during the period beginning September 11, 2001, and ending on the date prescribed by Presidential proclamation or by law as the last day of Operation Iraqi Freedom ; or
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in a campaign or expedition for which a campaign medal has been authorized, such as El Salvador, Lebanon, Granada, Panama, Southwest Asia, Somalia, and Haiti.

Medal holders and Gulf War veterans who originally enlisted after September 7, 1980, or entered on active duty on or after October 14, 1982, without having previously completed 24 months of continuous active duty, must have served continuously for 24 months or the full period called or ordered to active duty.

Effective on October 1, 1980, military retirees at or above the rank of major or equivalent, are not entitled to preference unless they qualify as disabled veterans.

Ten-point preference is given to:

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those honorably separated veterans who 1) qualify as disabled veterans because they have served on active duty in the Armed Forces (including training service in the Reserves or National Guard) at any time and have a present service-connected disability or are receiving compensation, disability retirement benefits, or pension from the military or the Department of Veterans Affairs; or 2) are Purple Heart recipients;
*

the spouse of a veteran unable to work because of a service-connected disability;
*

the unmarried widow of certain deceased veterans; and
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the mother of a veteran who died in service or who is permanently and totally disabled.

When applying for Federal jobs, eligible veterans should claim preference on their application or resume. Applicants claiming 10-point preference must complete form SF-15, Application for 10-Point Veteran Preference. Veterans who are still in the service may be granted 5 points tentative preference on the basis of information contained in their applications, but they must produce a DD Form 214 prior to appointment to document entitlement to preference.

Note: Reservists who are retired from the Reserves but are not receiving retired pay are not considered "retired military" for purposes of veterans' preference.

The Department of Labor's Office of the Assistant Secretary for Policy and Veterans Employment and Training Service developed an "expert system" to help veterans receive the preferences to which they are entitled. Two versions of this system are currently available, both of which help the veterans determine the type of preference to which they are entitled, the benefits associated with the preference and the steps necessary to file a complaint due to the failure of a Federal Agency to provide those benefits. To find out whether you qualify for veterans’ preference, visit America's Job Bank, operated by the Department of Labor (DOL). The Internet address for the Veterans’ preference program is:
Veterans preference worked for me, in the first federal job that I applied for. Any combat tour counts toward vacation also, from day one. Once you are in it also counts for promotions. If you pay into the federal retirement extra for those years your serve while in active duty the may count towards your federal civilian retirement.
RetArmyVet05
I would recommend that you visit the VA and try to get disability if you haven't done so yet. The 10 point preference really does make a difference!!!

why would you recommend that to anyone if there was nothing wrong with them? thats the reason people who actually do have things wrong with them are constantly overlooked....
Spouse is 10% SC. He used it for his first federal job out of college - hey - it works - especially if you weren't necessarily a 4.0'er. Worked his way up in a few years, got his Master's at night, and left.

Also, converted his military time to civil service time and when he retires someday, there's a nice little pension over there waiting for him.

The Feds are hiring like crazy right now - there are something like 35,000 openings right now when normally there are only 15 - 18,000. You know, usajobs.com. Or, go to CPOL (type in CPOL on the google search line) for open U.S. Army civil service jobs. Develop a resume in RESUMIX and then you can use it over and over, or edit it, and self nominate to your heart's content.

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